Campuses:

vortices

Thursday, January 18, 2018 - 3:30pm - 4:20pm
Peter Sternberg (Indiana University)
I will analyze a model for thin film nematics whose salient feature is that one elastic constant is much larger than the others. The goal is to understand how this extreme anisotropy in elastic constants affects the morphology of singular structures emerging in the limit where the width of domain walls and the core of vortices approaches zero.
Thursday, April 14, 2011 - 9:00am - 10:00am
Beth Wingate (Los Alamos National Laboratory)
Earth's high latitudes stand to be among the first regions affected by
climate change issues due to changes induced by melting ice in the
Arctic and Antarctic. Motivated by gaining fundamental understanding
of ocean dynamics at high latitudes my collaborators and I have
derived new equations, based on the method of multiple scales
presented in Embid and Majda (1996,1998), that address the scale
separation between slow- and fast-time scale dynamics in the limit of
Wednesday, March 9, 2011 - 3:45pm - 4:45pm
John Steinhoff (University of Tennessee)
There are many cases where strong vortices shed by parts of a moving body impinge on or come close to other parts of the body that are downwind. These include diverse bodies ranging from aircraft, to race cars to golf balls.
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