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IMA Workshop
Computational Neuroscience
January 14-23, 1998


Organizers:

Larry Abbott
Bard Ermentrout
Nancy Kopell
John Rinzel, Chair

Of primary interest to neuroscientists are the roles of the highly nonlinear intrinsic properties of individual neurons and coupling properties between cells that determine the dynamical activity of neuronal networks. Unique mathematical features of cell-based neuronal models that underlie complex spatio-temporal patterns are the multiple and vast time scales of ionic currents (from milliseconds to seconds) and the circuit properties which include local as well as long-range coupling, possibly with random connectivity, and with kinetic aspects (time constants for decay of synaptic variables). This workshop consisted of three intense two to four-day Focus Sessions, each bringing together experimentalists and theoreticians for concentrating on specific active areas of research in computational neuroscience. Overview talks for each Focus Session provided essential biological and modeling background specific to that Focus Session. These overviews replaced the general tutorials that had been included in earlier plans for the workshop's first two days.

Topics included stereotypical dynamical behavior such as network rhythms seen during sleep and epilepsy, as well as more complex phenomena associated with goal-directed behavior or perception. Models for such higher-level cognitive function may assume that cell-based properties have been averaged into more macroscopic descriptions. Experimental model systems include brain slices of thalamus, hippocampus, and cortex and in vivo recordings in sensory and motor areas during visual and movement tasks.

  • Focus Session #1 -- Early Vision: receptive fields, feature detecting, feedforward and intracortical tuning mechanisms. Wednesday, January 14 to Saturday noon, January 17.

  • Focus Session #2 -- Hippocampus and Navigation. Sunday evening, January 18 and Monday, January 19.

  • Focus Session #3 -- Cortical Dynamics Sunday afternoon, January 18; Wednesday, January 21 through Friday noon, January 23.

    Click on the titles to find abstracts and/or links to presentation materials

    SCHEDULE for WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14
    W. Miller, R. Gulliver, J. Rinzel
    Welcome and Orientation
    Robert Shapley,
    Center for Neural Science, NYU
    The Neural Basis of Visual Perception
    Judith Hirsch,
    Rockefeller University
    Repetitive Field Structure at Early Stages of Visual Processing
    Ralph Freeman,
    Univ. of California, Berkeley
    Receptive field analysis of space and time in the visual cortex
    David Somers,
    MIT
    Choosing the cellular components of large-scale neural circuits: In praise of the integrate-and-fire neuron
    Jack Cowan,
    University of Chicago
    Modelling Large–Scale Cortical Activity
    SCHEDULE for THURSDAY, JANUARY 15
    David Ferster,
    Northwestern University
    Assembly of receptive fields in cat visual cortex
    Kenneth D. Miller,
    Univ. of Calif., San Francisco
    Contrast-invariant orientation tuning in cat V1: Correlation-Based Feedforward and Intracortical Circuitry
    Haim Sompolinsky,
    Hebrew University
    Orientation Tuning in Visual Cortex: From Simple Models to Real Brains
    Barbara Chapman,
    Univ. of Calif., Davis
    How the Visual Cortex Got Its Stripes
    SCHEDULE for FRIDAY, JANUARY 16
    S. Murray Sherman,
    SUNY, Stony Brook
    Control of Gating through the LGN
    David W. McLaughlin, Courant Institute, NYU Modelling the Layered Structure of V1
    Nicholas Swindale,
    Univ. British Columbia
    Cortical Maps: Gradient Relationships and Learning Rules
    David Somers,
    MIT
    A local circuit view of integrating long-range cortical inputs
    Jack Cowan,
    University of Chicago
    A Simple Model for Cortical Orientation Selectivity and its Consequences
    SCHEDULE for SATURDAY, JANUARY 17
    Yang Dan,
    Univ. of California, Berkeley
    Encoding and Decoding of visual information in the thalamus
    Tony Bell,
    Interval, Inc
     
    SCHEDULE for SUNDAY, JANUARY 18
    Roger D. Traub,
    Univ. of Birmingham Medical Sch
    Cellular mechanisms of the 40 Hz cortical oscillation: studies in brain slices and with simulations
    Nancy Kopell,
    Boston University
    Synchronization and Modulation in Networks of Neurons
    James M. Bower,
    Calif. Inst. of Technology
    Cortical oscillations and the single neuron: Timing is everything
    L. F. Abbott,
    Brandeis University
    Navigation Maps Through Population Coding of Location in the Rat Hippocampus
    Bill Skaggs,
    University of Pittsburgh
    Theta phase precession of hippocampal place cell activity: data, models, and functional significance
    SCHEDULE for MONDAY, JANUARY 19
    Misha Tsodyks,
    Weizmann Institute
    Network model of theta rhythm and temporal coding in the Hippocampus
    Peter Dayan,
    MIT
    Temporal Difference Models of Navigation
    John Lisman,
    Brandeis University
    Buffers, autoassociators, and heteroassociators
    Kenneth Blum,
    MIT
    Knockouts, Networks and Navigation
    Poster Session Hallway of Vincent Hall 5th Floor
    SCHEDULE for TUESDAY, JANUARY 20
    Rob Butera,
    NIH
    Respiratory rhythm generation in the pre-Botzinger complex in mammals
    Dave Pinto,
    University of Pittsburgh
    Response tuning in the somato-sensory cortex
    Eugene Izhikevich,
    Arizona State University
    Weakly connected neural neworks: A review
    Giovanni Zanzotto,
    Universita di Padova
    Problems in a Unified Kinematics of Simple and Multilattices
    Wave Discussion  
    Synchrony Discussion  
    Poster Session Hallway of Vincent Hall 5th Floor
    SCHEDULE for WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 21
    Arthur Sherman,
    NIH
    Mechanisms of Synaptic Enhancement and Depression
    John Rinzel,
    Courant Inst., New York University
    Network Dynamics Mediated by Synaptic Depression
    Charles Wilson,
    Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis
    The generation of corticostriatal firing patterns: roles for synaptic and intrinsic mechanisms
    Xiao-Jing Wang,
    Brandeis University
    Neuronal Mechanisms of Visuospatial Working Memory in Prefrontal Cortex
    Poster Session Hallway of Vincent Hall 5th Floor
    SCHEDULE for THURSDAY, JANUARY 22
    Bard Ermentrout,
    University of Pittsburgh
    Synaptically generated waves
    David Golomb,
    Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
    Synchrony of large sparse neuronal networks
    Alain Destexhe,
    Laval University
    How the cortex controls thalamically-generated oscillations
    David Terman,
    Ohio State University
    The Role of Inhibition in Synchronizing Neural Oscillations: A Geometric Approach
    SCHEDULE for FRIDAY, JANUARY 23
    Wulfram Gerstner ,
    Federal Inst. of Techn., Lausanne
    Dynamics in homogeneous populations of spiking neurons --- stability, locking, and fast transients
    David Hansel,
    École Polytechnique
    The role of adaptation in shaping spatio-temporal patterns of neural activity of large neural networks
    Discussion Session  

     

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